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When did you first 'find' TDC?
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Brian Shelf



Joined: 21 Nov 2002
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Location: Possibly back

PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Benny J wrote:
Haha. When's that out on DVD? I've had the old TV rips for years, waiting for the day they can be deleted and replaced with proper versions.


It's out now....

BUY IT....

http://www.hmv.co.uk/hmvweb/displayProductDetails.do?sku=542907&WT.mc_id=101002

10 pounds there for one of the most criminally underated shows of all time.
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Fantsu



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lots of nice stories Smile - thanks people! Still I'd like to read more, keep 'em coming!
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Lord Summerisle



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was sat in a sports shop, trying on some new trainers, when 'Alfie' came
on the radio. When it was over the DJ said that it was the new single from
TDC. As soon as I had paid for my new trainers, I headed of the HMV and
bought the single (Or The Cassanova Compaion, as I was called).

And I've never looked back.
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Rickyboy



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I’m sure I’ve written about this somewhere on the BB before, but here goes anyway.

I was in my second year at university. I had an awareness of The Divine Comedy, knowing that they had provided the music for Father Ted and having read a gig review and interview in Q. The photo that accompanied the feature showed Neil in full shirt and tie mode lying languidly down on stage whilst singing. Something about the article registered with me, but besides the Father Ted theme music and My Lovely Horse, everything that had so far been on radio and TV had completely passed me by.

At some point around Autumn 1996 I was in the living room of the house I was living in in Wakefield, and I could hear The Frog Princess playing on the radio in my housemate’s room. I actually thought it was Vic Reeves! I kept listening, and the DJ namechecked it as The Divine Comedy when it finished playing. I heard it a few more times and loved it – a song in the charts that not only had fantastic, meaningful lyrics but also a beautiful, lush orchestral arrangement.

Back home for the Christmas holidays, it turned out that my brother had Casanova. He lent it to me and I listened to it constantly over the next couple of weeks. It “spoke” to me in a way that very few albums have ever done. On my return to Wakefield I bought my own copy, and also bought Liberation and Promenade, the latter having an even deeper effect on me than Casanova. Not so long after that, A Short Album About Love came out, and again it “spoke” to me. A triple whammy! The rest of my time at university was to a DC-heavy soundtrack, and the daily bus trip from Wakefield to Bretton Hall (and back again) on the 444 was usually accompanied by Casanova on my headphones. If there were no traffic delays, it would usually last perfectly from door to door. There was a time when I could associate various points during the journey with particular points during the album, and to this day it always reminds me of that journey.

So there we are. My university days were a very special time for me, and discovering the DC during that time enhanced it. Those first four albums are inextricably tied to that period in my life.
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Born Yesterday



Joined: 22 Nov 2002
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

9 May 1994: Tori Amos gig in The Hague. Support: a three piece band called The Divine Comedy. I especially remember 'Your Daddy's Car' and 'Wuthering Heights'.
A free postcard was given away there with the cover of Promenade. I bought Promenade a couple of months later (can't remember exactly really, but I bought it together with dEUS' Worst Case Scenario).
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Katja



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

1995-6: I remember TDC being talked about a lot in our 6th form because Neil was dating the sister of one of the boys in the 'cool gang.' It's not the sort of music that they'd normally listen to, but because of this connection they talked about the band a lot. At this time I hated all pop music (although shortly afterwards became interested in Pulp, Blur, Supergrass..) Someone told me I ought to give them a listen as they weren't like other bands, and their music was intelligent. I then heard SFTW and Alfie and thought 'ah this is a bit different, I shall buy the album.' So I did and I liked it. I thought it was nice to hear a bit of humour in popular music for a change.

But THEN I found Lib and Prom in a second-hand shop and they blew my ruddy socks off. I remember a strong feeling of 'ah THIS is what I've been looking for, and THIS is the kind of music I would like to make if only I could.' And then I became increasingly obsessed, purchasing every B-side and deleted EP...... My first gig was in 1998 in Sheffield (I was too scared to go to earlier gigs cos I was totally in awe of Neil and thought I might faint or wee myself). I joined the board around then I think.... Since then I've been less obsessed and fanatical but of course I still buy all the b-sides. The early albums will always have a special place in my heart cos of the age I was at the time. And cos they're especially good!
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Au revoir, joie...



Joined: 19 Oct 2004
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ace thread Fantsu!!

Hmmm, let's see. It was around 1995/6, like Katja, when I discovered TDC for the first time. As I was about 12/13 at the time and didn't have enough money to buy proper albums, my experience of TDC was limited to hearing songs off the radio and taping them. Occasionally the odd song would pop up on a compilation album (I got many of them for my birthdays and Christmas) and it got added to my TDC tape. It was so nice to find music that wasn't bland, anodyne, or heavily influenced by R n' B harmonies. What's more, I really admired Neil for having what I saw at the time as a sort of classical voice, it made me feel so much better during school concerts when I was the only person that didn't sing in a nasal, pseudo-American manner with extra warbling. No one else knew about the band in the (very very small) circle of people that I considered friends, and while it made me stand out, in hindsight I think that was a good thing.

It was only when I got to secondary school that I really started getting into TDC. I had a collection of taped songs, including a few album tracks, and when I had enough money to start buying the CDs it was a revelation. Still, noone seemed to know or care about TDC apart from a vague recollection of SFTW. I remember my mother hearing 'Frog Princess' on the radio once and remarking that it was the stupidest song she'd ever heard. I was not impressed. Anyway, it snowballed (in negative...sorry) from there and, ten years later, I'm more committed than ever, but not obsessed! The best way to describe my relationship with the music is to suggest that all of us have little niches in our brains that certain artists or music fit into, with a gentle click. Most of us have more than one. It seems that TDC fits just perfectly into one of these musical niches that exists somewhere in the dark depths of my grey matter...
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Geordie



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Summer 96, I was at the Reading Festival and at a loose end one night where I wasn't bothered about the headline act. The Melody Maker Stage had Rocket From The Crypt whilst the Dr Marten's Tent had The Divine Comedy. I'd heard "On a Rope" by the former and "That one about the woodshed" by the latter. Thankfully me mate Jon decided and TDC it was, bloody brilliant. Very Happy

I ask for this repeatedly but please, please, please does anyone have a set list? Not knowing the majority of the tunes I just can't recall what they played beyond SFTW, Alfie and TFP.
Sad
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lucyamb



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I heard "Somethiung For The Weekend" on the radio, at work, and heard the line about "something in the woodshed" which had my ears out on stalks, so to speak. When I was about 10, my mum gave me Cold Comfort Farm to read. It was the first, proper, grown up book I'd ever read, and remains one of my favourite books to this day. To hear a quote from that book knocked me sideways. I went out and bought Casanova on tape, and never looked back Very Happy
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Jonathan



Joined: 21 Feb 2004
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm a bandwagon-jumping woodshedder and proud of it.
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Lord Summerisle



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

lucyamb wrote:
I heard "Somethiung For The Weekend" on the radio, at work, and heard the line about "something in the woodshed" which had my ears out on stalks, so to speak. When I was about 10, my mum gave me Cold Comfort Farm to read. It was the first, proper, grown up book I'd ever read, and remains one of my favourite books to this day. To hear a quote from that book knocked me sideways. I went out and bought Casanova on tape, and never looked back Very Happy



Is it from Cold Comfort Farm? It's been some years since I read it (about 20).
I thought the quote was from The Camomile Lawn.
"Little Sophie saw something in the woodshed".
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Katja



Joined: 25 Nov 2002
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think I read that Neil watched the film version of Cold Comfort Farm. Kate Beckinsale was in it. I think he said something about finding her very beautiful but that if anyone that beautiful was ever interested in him, he would be very suspicious. Hence the whole being beaten up by men in a shed!
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Gilderoy Lockheart



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Katja wrote:
1995-6: I remember TDC being talked about a lot in our 6th form because Neil was dating the sister of one of the boys in the 'cool gang.'


Cor, that's a claim to fame!

Was she fit?


(and another Chris Evans/Radio 1 DC-discoverer here. say what you like about the ginger one, he did his bit for Britain by telling us about Neil Yes Yes )
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lucyamb



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lord Summerisle wrote:
lucyamb wrote:
I heard "Somethiung For The Weekend" on the radio, at work, and heard the line about "something in the woodshed" which had my ears out on stalks, so to speak. When I was about 10, my mum gave me Cold Comfort Farm to read. It was the first, proper, grown up book I'd ever read, and remains one of my favourite books to this day. To hear a quote from that book knocked me sideways. I went out and bought Casanova on tape, and never looked back Very Happy



Is it from Cold Comfort Farm? It's been some years since I read it (about 20).
I thought the quote was from The Camomile Lawn.
"Little Sophie saw something in the woodshed".





It was Cold Comfort Farm, Great aunt Ada Doom saw something nasty in the woodshed, but we never found out what it was.
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Fantsu



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've seen Cold Comfort Farm but it was long before I knew about TDC Laughing Now I have to watch it again sometime...
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Lord Summerisle



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

lucyamb wrote:
Lord Summerisle wrote:
lucyamb wrote:
I heard "Somethiung For The Weekend" on the radio, at work, and heard the line about "something in the woodshed" which had my ears out on stalks, so to speak. When I was about 10, my mum gave me Cold Comfort Farm to read. It was the first, proper, grown up book I'd ever read, and remains one of my favourite books to this day. To hear a quote from that book knocked me sideways. I went out and bought Casanova on tape, and never looked back Very Happy



Is it from Cold Comfort Farm? It's been some years since I read it (about 20).
I thought the quote was from The Camomile Lawn.
"Little Sophie saw something in the woodshed".







It was Cold Comfort Farm, Great aunt Ada Doom saw something nasty in the woodshed, but we never found out what it was.



You learn something new everyday. Laughing
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Katja



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gilderoy Lockheart wrote:

Was she fit?


I never actually saw her (although she worked at the same music shop as me and Rusty at some point!). Her name is under the thankyou bit of the inlay of ASAAL. Her brother was..hmm... unremarkable (with a small 'u'!!).
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Phil



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 12:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For me it was Frog Princess on TFI Friday. I'm not quite sure why I love that song so much. Anyway, bought all the albums after that and there you go.
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CG



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 1:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I remember Mark Radcliffe playing a song on his late night show many many years ago, I only caught the end of it so didnt know what the song was called or who it was by
but remember thinking they sound good (wasn't till later that I twigged when i heard Bernice & had the "I recognize that" feeling)
Would have been 21/22 at the time.

The major wake up call to TDC was like many other, Chris Evans & the whole breakfast biggie, playing the song twice & so on.
I wrote the name of the song & band down and thought must check them out further,
with no internet at that time the record shop was where i started...as you do.

Found SFTW CD single & just loved it, couldn't get enough, The Father Ted connection also sealed it for me.
the following weekend went to HMV & looked for other TDC stuff found Casanova (there was only one copy)
and saw Liberation & Promenade in the section also, thinking to myself WOW there are 2 other albums & how have i not heard of TDC before now ?
anyway bought Casanova, went home listened to it on my portable CD player & was just blown away.

The following Saturday went back to HMV to get other albums that i had seen the previous week
crossing my fingers they still had them as there had only been 1 copy of each
lucky both CD's were still there behind the plastic name card....along with the Milla one Laughing

Bought both Liberation & Promenade & that just sealed my love of TDC
just couldn't believe how beautiful they both were & so much better than
what was being played on Radio at the time.

TDC have been more than a regular part of my life since then & always will be Very Happy
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Chordmeister



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Isle of Wight, Summer 1998, in a cottage by the sea at:

50°35'20.56"N
1°13'26.58"W

I first heard Fin, after meinen Bruder, Woddaz, heard National Express (on Radio 2 I guess) and bought the album and waved it in front of my face.

National Express was fun alright, but the whole album (esp. the first half) bowled me over. Similar to what Katja said really: at the time, I didn't think pop music had anything to offer me. On listening to TDC for the first time, it was discovering pop music that I didn't think I'd ever find in existence - pop music as good as I'd imagined (and hoped) pop music could be.

Which was nice.
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rusty66
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was a big Pulp fan 'round about 1996, and a friend of mine said that if I liked Pulp, I should give DC a try.

She took me to my first DC gig (York Hall in Bethnal Green, the launch gig for 'Alfie') and I was completely bowled over, and a couple of days later, bought up Liberation and Promenade on vinyl.

Managed to get tickets for the ASAAL gig (which I went to by myself as I knew no-one else that liked DC) and went through a complete DC obsession. Unfortunately, this waned whilst I was at University, though a friend of mine did buy Fin, which I would listen to an awful lot.

I feel a bit shitty that I lost touch with DC around about Regeneration, and only really started to get back into them again when I went to the RAH gig. But I can safely say that not a day has gone by since that night at the RAH, that I haven't listened to at least 1 DC song. And since June last year, I haven't removed my DC minidisc from my player, and it accompanies me to and from work every single day.
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Au revoir, joie...



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 1:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rusty66 wrote:
I was a big Pulp fan 'round about 1996, and a friend of mine said that if I liked Pulp, I should give DC a try.


I love the fact that so many people on here were getting through 1996, musically speaking, with the help of TDC and Pulp. And I thought I was just a sad and lonely 12/13 year old, entirely on my own...
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msboyd



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

billy bob thornton wrote:
Promenade. None of that johnny-come-lately 'woodshed' bandwagon jumping for me! Laughing


Very Happy

Me too -- odd that it would be Us Americans who got that one first. (Although to be fair, I was living in the UK doing the postgrad thing at the time -- 1995: friend who was already a convert insisted I give it a listen as 'he's got a new album coming out and it's going to be great.')

It was actually The Booklovers that got me hooked.
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Shorty



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 2:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My turn my turn.

I was a lowly warehouse boy at the age of 18, doing some god awful work. The only thing that made my life bearable was Mark and Lard on radio 1. I hate Radio 1 but these two guys seemed to rise above the rest of the shite and produced a good radio show.


They played "Come Home Billy Bird" and I instantly fell in love with the backing vocals of Lauren Laverne. I told myself I had to buy the album...but I never did. I never buy an album off the back of one track, especially an un-heard of artist - Foolish boy...

...fast forward to oct 2005. I'm driving along with my mate to yet another Kettering Town away game. We're listening to Jonny Ross and on comes "In Pursuit of Happiness". Again I instantly fall in love with the instrumental middle part. How can this song so brilliant be played on the radio? - it's as about as much airplay appeal as Shine On You Crazy Diamond!
Once again I tell myself to invest in some Divine Comedy but it never happened Sad

But the day finally came...I'd recently moved out of my Dad's house to my own place, and I liked to make a point of going round to check all was OK (of course it was OK, he'ld got a house to himself again!)
I brought round this sumptuous bottle of red, and he put on the Palladium gig. Needless to say I loved it, and within 10 hours of watching it (sleep first) I ordered my own copy.

Rather scary is that my Dad was hooked by TDC on the very same occasion I was, and yet we were about 200 miles apart at the time....... Neutral
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satine



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 5:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Basically it is the fault of two sources - Yann Tiersen, and the Times Culture magazine.

I had solely geeky taste in music until I was about 13 or 14. I was listening at that point mostly to classical music and musical theatre. I ended up buying the Amelie soundtrack because I'd liked the film and it was on sale, and I was hooked on it, so went straight out and bought all of the rest of Tiersen's albums, which were *so* different from anything I'd listened to previously. They ended up serving as sort of my crossover between classical and contemporary stuff, I think.

A couple of months on I was at a friend's house and flicking through her Times Culture magazine (which my family doesn't get), and lo and behold there was an article in there for Absent Friends, mentioning that Yann was playing on one of the tracks, which obviously I had to investigate. Went into a Virgin Megastore, where they had AF hooked up to a listening station, listened, was very very impressed, paid up instantly, and the rest is history, methinks.

TDC have been the bridge to my discovering all sorts of other music I never would have expected to enjoy since, so praise be to the Hannon Wink .
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James R



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

October 1994, 17 years old, a couple of years into my bedsit indie phase; heavily into Butler-era Suede, the Smiths and Pulp. Select magazine was therefore my musical bible. Promenade got a five-star review. I was struck by the reviewer's comment that the album did not contain any electric guitars, and by his closing entreaty about buying the album and being on the side of the angels. I thought the Divine Comedy were a group, and not just yer Neil Hannon.

In Guernsey we have one indie store and it didn't stock Promenade. A few weeks later I found a copy of the CD in HMV in London. Maybe my expectations were too high, maybe I was too enamoured with trad bass/drums/guitars indie, but the album left me completely cold. After a perfunctory listen it sat on the shelf, unplayed, for over a year. A second attempt made me realise that The Summerhouse and Tonight We Fly had something, but I was still unsure.

Spring 1996 and the local indie store has Casanova on display. This was the original, pre-single release, and I wasn't expecting it. I looked through the lyric booklet, loved the lyrics to SFTW, and decided to give the 'band' a second try. Then... Frog Princess, Songs of Love, the first 'proper' single, Liberation, the realisation that Promenade was, in fact, the greatest record ever, ASAAL, etc etc. And it was 'Eric the Gardener' that brought me out of a coma in 1999.
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billy bob thornton



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 7:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you swines hadn't bought Casanova/Fin, then Neil would be Surfan/Sufjan/Surfing Safari Stevens by now. Fact. Twisted Evil
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Fantsu



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 27, 2006 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is that a good or a bad thing?
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Tiinkerbell



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2006 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rickyboy wrote:
I’m sure I’ve written about this somewhere on the BB before, but here goes anyway.

I was in my second year at university. I had an awareness of The Divine Comedy, knowing that they had provided the music for Father Ted and having read a gig review and interview in Q. The photo that accompanied the feature showed Neil in full shirt and tie mode lying languidly down on stage whilst singing. Something about the article registered with me, but besides the Father Ted theme music and My Lovely Horse, everything that had so far been on radio and TV had completely passed me by.

At some point around Autumn 1996 I was in the living room of the house I was living in in Wakefield, and I could hear The Frog Princess playing on the radio in my housemate’s room. I actually thought it was Vic Reeves! I kept listening, and the DJ namechecked it as The Divine Comedy when it finished playing. I heard it a few more times and loved it – a song in the charts that not only had fantastic, meaningful lyrics but also a beautiful, lush orchestral arrangement.

Back home for the Christmas holidays, it turned out that my brother had Casanova. He lent it to me and I listened to it constantly over the next couple of weeks. It “spoke” to me in a way that very few albums have ever done. On my return to Wakefield I bought my own copy, and also bought Liberation and Promenade, the latter having an even deeper effect on me than Casanova. Not so long after that, A Short Album About Love came out, and again it “spoke” to me. A triple whammy! The rest of my time at university was to a DC-heavy soundtrack, and the daily bus trip from Wakefield to Bretton Hall (and back again) on the 444 was usually accompanied by Casanova on my headphones. If there were no traffic delays, it would usually last perfectly from door to door. There was a time when I could associate various points during the journey with particular points during the album, and to this day it always reminds me of that journey.

So there we are. My university days were a very special time for me, and discovering the DC during that time enhanced it. Those first four albums are inextricably tied to that period in my life.


Oh my GOD!!!

I was going to write my story any way but I just had to comment on your story as I used to listen to TDC on my walkman on the 444 from Manygates to Bretton too! (Then Pinderfields Road when I moved there) Mental!
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Tiinkerbell



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2006 7:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Loving this thread. I have really enjoyed reading your stories.

I got into TDC 1995-96 with Frog Princess and Woman of the World. My Boyfriends brother was very into music and was very upto date. He played me These two songs and I totally fell in love with TDC, I loved how Woman of the world sounded like it was from a musical. I went out and bought Casanova, Liberation and Promenade (Something I had never done before and have never done since with any band).

I don't really remember listening to much else. I went to Bretton Hall in 1997 and by the second year I had converted the girl who lived opposite me, we used to play our TDC music really loud at the same time! I was on the contemporary dance course and one of my tutors used to play Casanova for some of the warm up exercises, he used Charge and Songs of Love. In 1998 we went to see them live at a tiny little gig and I bought a giant poster for £2 outside the place.

From then on I bought everything that TDC released and thought I was totally alone in my love until I found all of you and the rest is history xx
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Rickyboy



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2006 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Blimey Tiink...

Our paths must have crossed, however fleetingly, at Bretton! I was on the DA course from 1995-98, so I'll have been in my third year when you started. I'm sure you must have attended Ikon on Monday nights or Source on Wednesdays...

*Gets all misty-eyed and nostalgic*

Incidentally, have you heard about this?
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Das Kitty



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2006 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Monkey Trousers wrote:
Chris Evans for me some 10 years ago. The days when Radio 1 was half decent and TFI was actually quite good!!


Snap. I don't think it was humanly possible to find them on my own before then, I was only 16 afterall with no internet or anyone even remotely interested in music in my life.
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Absolute Power
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2006 10:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've got a story about my first proper DC gig. I've probably told it before but hey I'm bored.

In 1998 I had just left university and was living at home again with the parents, so my dad thought he'd make use of me and asked if I would drive him up to Bristol where he was working. It was a busy week for him I think and he didn't want to overdo it. I dropped him where he was working and then drove into Bristol and wondered around the city for the day. I no money on me after I had eaten my lunch so I wondered around music shops looking but not actually being in a position to purchase. One of the stores was selling gig tickets, one listed was for The Divine Comedy at the Anson Rooms the following month. I was very annoyed with my cash flow problems. In between shops I was approached by a man. He explained that he was a police officer and asked if I had the time to take part in a line-up. There was a tenner in it for me, and as I had nothing better to do I agreed. After a slightly nervous half an hour trying not to laugh I emerged from the station with £10, and you can guess what I spent it on.
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The Boatman



Joined: 11 Dec 2002
Posts: 293
Location: The Lake

PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 12:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think this may have already been told in an old issue of Muse, but:

Another Tori story, a friend of mine went to see Tori Amos in early '95 and was impressed with the support enough to buy their album. He played 'The Booklovers' at a party in his (student) room and I got the album the next day and Liberation the week after.
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sponge monkey



Joined: 21 Nov 2002
Posts: 1538
Location: Stubbornly refusing to use an avatar since 2000.

PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 1:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm guessing summer '93, because 'Lib' had just been released and NH was doing a session on Mark Radcliffe's late night R1 show with (IIRC) Chris Worsey and Natalie Box, playing 'YDC' while I was driving back from a band rehearsal (we were called 'My Favourite Shirt', if anyone caught us...). It was about 11pm and I remember I was here, just past the 'Red Lion' in Kings Heath, Birmingham.

Went and bought 'Lib' the very next day, but declined the temptation of all those pristine, sealed 'Fanfare' and 'Europop' CDs that littered the rack. Kopf tut weh Kopf tut weh Kopf tut weh
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Gin Soaked Lucy



Joined: 15 Sep 2006
Posts: 456
Location: On my knees

PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 10:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

About 9 months ago I was told to research The Divine Comedy by Dante. While on the internet I type in 'the divine comedy' and of course a certain deliteful website came up first -it was a welcome distraction and it seemed to ring vague bells as a band. Reading various posts in this here forum I realise Father Ted was the sourse of the bell ringing. About a week later I was in junk shop looking at old records and noticed box of singles on floor. One of then was National Express. I bought it and loved it-something just clicked and the cover of The Magnetic Fields Famous was also a very pleasent surprise. Now have bought all the albums!

Last edited by Gin Soaked Lucy on Wed May 02, 2007 10:10 am; edited 1 time in total
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Dagada Dagada



Joined: 21 Nov 2002
Posts: 5361
Location: Eggy Burp

PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I thought they were a load of old pretentious wank. Then I accidentally listened to their albums and realised how wrong I was.

No goats and kittens were involved, Fluff. Honest.*











*note - goats and kittens may have been involved.
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Miff



Joined: 16 Dec 2004
Posts: 12
Location: Overstrand

PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 12:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I first discovered TDC attached to the front of my breakfast cereal.

Golden grahams had a complilation CD on the front which featured commuter love. It rather took my fancy so I borrowed Fin from the local library and the rest is history!
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Rowan Morrison



Joined: 21 Nov 2002
Posts: 1330
Location: Wigan Casino. Keeping the faith.

PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Miff wrote:
I first discovered TDC attached to the front of my breakfast cereal.


That one is my favourite. Very Happy
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Fantsu



Joined: 14 Dec 2004
Posts: 6004
Location: Assuming the perpendicular

PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 1:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I would have liked that one too! Laughing
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